Posts Tagged ‘War in Afghanistan (2001–present)’

In this acclaimed Lannan foundation lecture from September 2002, Arundhati Roy speaks poetically to power on the U.S. War on Terror, globalization, the misuses of nationalism, and the growing chasm between the rich and poor. With lyricism and passion, Roy combines her literary talents and encyclopedic knowledge to expose injustice and provide hope for a future world.

 

 

Arundhati Roy With Howard Zinn: A Conversation After the Come September Speech – 18 September 2002

 

 

The War You Don't See

The War You Don’t See: A powerful and timely investigation into the media’s role in war, tracing the history of embedded and independent reporting from the carnage of World War One to the destruction of Hiroshima, and from the invasion of Vietnam to the current war in Afghanistan and disaster in Iraq.

As weapons and propaganda become even more sophisticated, the nature of war is developing into an electronic battlefield in which journalists play a key role, and civilians are the victims. But who is the real enemy?
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Full film was removed from YouTube, so here’s the full interview of Julian Assange:

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Participants

  1. Professor Stuart Ewen – media historian
  2. Professor Melvin Goodman – former CIA analyst
  3. Dan Rather – CBS Evening News anchor and managing editor, 1981-2005
  4. Bryan Whitman – US Assist. Secretary of Defense
  5. Rageh Omaar – BBC world affairs reporter, 2000-2006
  6. Dahr Jamail – journalist & author, Beyond the Green Zone
  7. David Rose – former Observer journalist
  8. Steve RendallFairness & Accuracy in Reporting
  9. Fran Unsworth – BBC Head of Newsgathering
  10. David Mannion – Former Editor in Chief, ITV News
  11. Mark Curtis – historian & author, Web of Deceit
  12. Phil Shiner – Public Interest Lawyers
  13. Guy Smallman – war reporter & photographer
  14. Carne Ross – British Foreign Office, 1989-2004
  15. Professor Greg Philo – Glasgow University Media Group
  16. Cynthia McKinney – former US Congresswoman, 2008 Green Party presidential candidate
  17. Julian Assange – Editor in Chief, WikiLeaks

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Dear Mr. Reid,

It may shock you to know that many Americans think that what Wall Street speculators did to our economy is grounds for them to be killed. Would you be willing to support the extrajudicial assassinations of, say, the top 1000 Wall Street speculators?

Sincerely,

The 99%


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February 14, 2012 PBS News Hour


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Democracy Now! speaks with reporter Michael Hastings about the “disastrous past year” in Afghanistan, and the mentality a decade of war has bred there. The U.S. has “funneled billions of dollars in weapons and training into a chaotic place like Afghanistan … training these young guys to kill people, and then are shocked when they see the results,” Hastings says of the outcry that followed last week’s appearance of a video showing four uniformed U.S. Marines urinating on the corpses of three Afghan men, which has been widely condemned by officials in the United States and in Afghanistan. His new book, “The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan,” originated with his 2010 Rolling Stone article, “The Runaway General,” about Gen. Stanley McChrystal, then commander of the war in Afghanistan, and his inner circle. McChrystal was fired after the article was published.

RTAmerica : About ten years ago the US occupied Afghanistan to fight the Taliban. The war in Afghanistan has become one of the longest wars in US history. The war on terror in Afghanistan is considered a quagmire and many wonder what went wrong. Michael Hastings, the Rolling Stone reporter who is responsible for ending Stanley McChrystal‘s career, joins us to find out what went wrong in Afghanistan.

The U.S. intelligence community says in a secret new assessment that the war in Afghanistan is mired in stalemate, and warns that security gains from an increase in American troops have been undercut by pervasive corruption, incompetent governance and Taliban fighters operating from neighboring Pakistan, according to U.S. officials.

The sobering judgments, laid out in a classified National Intelligence Estimate completed last month and delivered to the White House, appeared at odds with recent optimistic statements by Pentagon officials and have deepened divisions between U.S. intelligence agencies and American military commanders about progress in the decade-old war.

The detailed document, known as an NIE, runs more than 100 pages and represents the consensus view of the CIA and 15 other U.S. intelligence agencies. Similar in tone to an NIE prepared a year ago, it challenges the Pentagon’s claim to have achieved lasting security gains in Taliban strongholds in southern Afghanistan, according to U.S. officials who have read or been briefed on its contents.

via LA Times